IL Condo-HOA Conference & Expo 2018

2018 IL Condo-HOA Conference & Expo
Donald E. Stephens Convention Center February 23-24  – Booth #224

Stop by The Pizzo Group booth at the IL Condo-HOA Conference & Expo to learn how you can reduce soil erosion around retention ponds, increase the beauty of your neighborhood, reduce the Canada Geese population, increase water quality and lower maintenance costs.

Learn more about the conference here:
https://www.cai-illinois.org/event/2018-il-condo-hoa-conference-expo/

Benefits of Native Buffers

Clean, clear, healthy water makes a pond beautiful. One way to ensure pristine waters is by installing a buffer of native plants along the shoreline. Although conventional solutions like rock or turf may seem like a good way to defend your shoreline from erosion, natives offer far more tremendous benefits.

Native wildflowers, grasses and aquatic plants are uniquely suited to hold soil in place, filter unwanted pollutants, and discourage nuisance wildlife like geese.

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Erosion control

The deep roots of native wildflowers and grasses hold soil in place against the damaging effects of wind, water, and ice. The shallow roots of turfgrass are easily ripped away in storms or flood events. Many native plants have root systems that reach down more than 6 feet, anchoring them in place. Aquatic plants installed in the shallow sections of your pond offer a subtle barrier against wave actions that can undermine and cut away banks.

Algae control

Algae blooms caused by too many nutrients in the water can choke out beneficial species like fish, frogs and turtles. Stormwater runoff full of pollutants and fertilizers is the biggest culprit of algae in ponds. Native plants can capture and sequester these pollutants before they reach the open water, eliminating algae and the need for expensive treatments.

Goose control

Canada geese have become so pervasive that they are a nuisance on ponds and basins. Geese prefer clear areas where they can see predators coming. Because native plants tend to be around three feet high or higher, they make geese uncomfortable. Instead of hiring a service, installing tall native species means geese will think twice before coming to your pond.

Attracting birds, butterflies, and beneficial insects

An amazing benefit to native plants is that they attract a huge range of birds, butterflies, bees and beneficial insects. Some songbirds nest in grasses and many consume the seeds of blooming plants like purple coneflower and black-eyed Susans. Milkweed and blazing star attract butterflies, bees, and predatory wasps. With a native plant buffer, you create important pollinator habitat.

Four season color and interest

Perhaps the most noticeable benefit to installing a native plant buffer is the sweeps of blooming wildflowers, the fall colors of the grasses, and the winter interest of dried seed heads and foliage. With a rich plant palette, you can enjoy flowers spring through fall. These plantings evoke the prairie heritage of Illinois and provide a sense of place

We encourage you to get out and explore these natural spaces. Discover new kinds of flowers, investigate insects, and watch for birds. Native plants not only work for you by controlling erosion, algae, and geese, they add beauty and habitat, too.

 

Winter Clearing for Beautiful Results

Is winter clearing of invasive woody species part of your stewardship plan?

Clearing invasive brush allows:

  • More sunlight and water to reach the desirable native plants already present
  • Dormant seed to awaken
  • Diverse species of birds, mammals and insects to thrive
  • High quality wildflowers to fill in and carpet the landscape

In winter, desirable native plants have gone dormant, allowing our crews to access and remove invasive woody shrubs and trees. When we perform brush clearing we target invasive trees and shrubs such as Box Elder, Silver Maple, Japanese Barberry, Common Buckthorn and Amur Honeysuckle. These trees and shrubs leaf out early and hold their leaves longer, preventing sun and water from reaching the native wildflowers and grasses. Once the stems have been cut back, it is necessary to treat the fresh stumps to prevent re-sprouting. Sometimes removal on nonnative trees such Ornamental Pear, Willow, and Black Locust is necessary. Follow up with a prescribed fire after clearing and see even better results.

With regular stewardship, your natural area or sustainable landscape can become a thriving, vibrant experience filled with plants, pollinators, and animals.

November Chamber Mixer at Journeyman Distillery

When: November 7, 2017

Where: The Grainery at Journeyman Distillery, 109 Generations Dr, Three Oaks
5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Check out Journeyman Distillery’s newest event space — The Grainery — and hear about their upcoming events.

Network with Chamber members , enjoy OCG punch, a cash bar, light appetizers and catch up on Chamber activities. Special members-only offer for an event booking!

Click here to register.

ILCA’s 58th Annual Party and Member Meeting

Join Us for ILCA’s 58th Annual Party and Member Meeting

When: Thursday, November 2, 2017

Where: Two Brothers Roundhouse
205 N. Broadway, Aurora, IL 60505
5:00pm-8:00pm

Over 300 people attended the 2016 Annual Party including the Board of Directors, Past-Presidents, company owners/senior managers, new members, and ILCA luminaries. It is a great evening of networking, recognizing achievements, food, and BEER!

Garden Club Presentation – Bringing Nature to Your Yard

When: November 9, 2017; 7pm

Where: Bolingbrook Garden Club Meeting

Who: Jack Pizzo, President of The Pizzo Group

Jack Pizzo, renowned ecologist and expert on all things native plants, will be sharing his ideas and successes with the Bolingbrook Garden Club. Jack will explain to attendees how to bring nature in the form of bees, butterflies, dragonflies and many of other of Mother Nature’s favorite pollinators to their backyard.

Register: For more information, visit the Bolingbrook Garden Club website.